Requiem

 

REQUIEM

Objectives:

  1. Students should be able to say “requiem” and know what it means.
  2. Students should be able to sing “Memory Eternal”.

 

Possible Lesson Plan:

  1. Open with prayer.

 

  1. Discuss with students the meaning of death.  Do they know anyone who has died?  How did it make them feel?  Why are they sad?

 

  1. What does the Bible say about death?  Review the raising of Lazarus from the dead and the resurrection; both stories are in the Children’s Bible.  What does God promise? (That we will also rise from the dead, just as He did.)

 

  1. Review the song, “Memory Eternal”.  Sing it with the children.

 

  1. Practice the word “requiem” with the children until they know it.  Requiem means remembering.  We sing “Memory Eternal” and ask God and everyone else to remember our friend forever.  Have each child make a list of people in his family or friends who have died; we will give these to Father so he can pray for them next Sunday as he prepares communion. This lesson comes right around Memorial Day; remind the children of the “real” meaning of this holiday.

 

  1. Make “koliva” – a special memorial food made of boiled wheat (We’ll do this as a group class after Sunday School.):

 

The day before class, take 1 poind of wheat berries and soak them in water in a large pot. Then drain them and boil for 4 hours in fresh water.  Drain again and spread on a large towel; bring them to class wrapped in the towel.

Empty the wheat berries into a mixing bowl.  Have the children add:

      ½ cup confectioners sugar

      1 tsp cinnamon

      2 cups raisins

      1 cup chopped walnuts

Pour onto serving tray and make a small hill.  Cover with thick layer of confectioner’s sugar and decorate with a candle in the center, crosses of silver candies, and a border of  candied almonds.  It looks almost too good to eat!

 

  1. Have each child hold a candle, grouped around the koliva, in front of the class icon corner.  Sing “Memory Eternal” together, each remembering someone special.

 

  1. Close with prayer, especially for those dead remembered by the children.